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1959 356A S/R coupe project chassis # 108625

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  • One small update for this build:
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    I took delivery of a real Cellette bench last October. Still have to buy the dedicated 356 jig fixture set next which will be a good chunk of change but I at least have the frame table now.
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    So it all sits in storage until the Convertible D is painted and gone.
    Thanks for looking!
    Justin
    Justin Rio

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    • Perfect start to getting a perfect part Justin. You have the perfect area to place that all in too ! When you have the final parts for the cellette you can be sure everything will fit to factory spec. If you are doing this work an item worth its weight in gold. ( Well worth a bit of it !)

      Roy

      Comment


      • JTR70
        JTR70 commented
        Editing a comment
        Could not agree more Roy. Now I can proceed with confidence when the day comes to begin on this project again.

        Justin

    • Back to steel work on this coupe:
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ID:	110548 I brain faded and left the doors I had previously repaired raw and they of course flash rusted during long term storage.
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ID:	110549 A quick application of acid made short work of it at least.
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      Cleaned up and ready for some sealer.
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ID:	110551 Undersides flash rusted as well..
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ID:	110552Areas now ready for a coat of expoxy.
      Justin Rio

      Comment


      • Original color:
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ID:	110554 Cleaned and polished a nice area of the Original paint for a camera match at my local paint store.
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ID:	110555Not a huge fan of red cars but this is at least a darker blood red which is much nicer than that orangey guards reds it was repainted at some point.
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ID:	110556 Sealer and tracer coat applied. Just some old dark red paint I've had lying around for about 20 years.
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ID:	110557Much more of a maroon but its at least in the same spectrum
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ID:	110558 Perfect for this application and nice to be able to use it up before it turns to jelly.
        Justin Rio

        Comment


        • Justin - what type of acid product did you use to remove the surface rust.
          1960 356B T5 - under major resurrection.
          356 Registry main thread;
          http://forum.porsche356registry.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=35854
          1968 912 - running like a scalded cat.

          Comment


          • JTR70
            JTR70 commented
            Editing a comment
            Just old fashioned pool acid (muriatic acid) found at any hardware store....

        • Initial right door re-fitment issues. Though this door is original and only the lower section was replaced its relation to the body's opening still managed to change on me.
          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7157.JPG Views:	0 Size:	94.3 KB ID:	110937 This was my "new" door fitment after the hinge pins where inserted. A humongous rear door gap
          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7160.JPG Views:	0 Size:	99.9 KB ID:	110938 And an almost non-existent forward gap. Its all pretty much still factory metal in through here so it obviously fit better before.
          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7158.JPG Views:	0 Size:	106.9 KB ID:	110939 The addition of the window frame really highlighted just how bad the fitment now was. The door had to come back at least 3mm.
          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7117.JPG Views:	0 Size:	104.3 KB ID:	110940 I had removed and reinstalled the lower hinge and mount during the longitudinal repairs but the upper hinge I had left as baseline of reference. With this new fitment issue I had no choice but to now reset it too . As you can see it has not been moved or disturbed since 1959. The factory green primer remains.
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ID:	110941 Same with the hinge and spacers. Though I tried to avoid it, urns out I disturbed just enough during the lower repairs to require a full reset. Hated to disturb this but I had no choice; in the end it has to all fit correctly.
          Last edited by JTR70; 03-14-2021, 09:44 PM.
          Justin Rio

          Comment


          • Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7120.JPG Views:	0 Size:	148.2 KB ID:	110943 In case you ever wondered who supplied Reutter with the door hinge castings.
            Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7121.JPG Views:	0 Size:	139.2 KB ID:	110944 Door needs to slide back so I ground the rear shoulder of the capture plate as thin as I could allowing it rest against the back wall of the mount as deep a possible.
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ID:	110945 It can now utilize the entire slotted hole. In the old days I would have mindlessly began opening up the back of the holes without a thought about the limits of the capture plate behind.
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ID:	110946 As the fit and re-fitment carried on I noticed that door had been sprung forward at some point and mounting surface of this upper mount was slightly bent.
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ID:	110947 As I'm shooting for optimal fitment I thought it best to straighten this surface back out. I cut the upper weld to break its strength then brought the area back out with a clamp and some heat.
            Last edited by JTR70; 03-14-2021, 10:01 PM.
            Justin Rio

            Comment


            • Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7212.JPG Views:	0 Size:	91.5 KB ID:	110949 After much ceremony I finally had this sitting back where it belonged.
              Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7214.JPG Views:	0 Size:	88.8 KB ID:	110950 After the upper hinge mount repair this forward upper gap was now way too wide with the hinge shimmed to its original configuration. After some additional jockeying around with the upper and lower shims this area really improved with an original thick removed. Can't really say this is the end as the leading edge of this fender will have to be cut repaired so its all going to change yet again, ever so slightly.
              Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7211.JPG Views:	0 Size:	117.4 KB ID:	110951 A lingering and very frustrating issue is this upper corner standing about 2mm to proud off of the body line. This was the point where I had to now stop. I wanted the door to fit closer and it does but remaining issue like this are part of the body panel phase and I'm not there quite yet. I need to finish all the chassis repairs first then I'll move onto body phase.
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ID:	110952 Switched gears and moved onto the removal of the left rocker assembly in preparation for the longitudinal repairs.
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ID:	110953 That next....
              Thanks for looking!
              Justin
              Last edited by JTR70; 03-14-2021, 10:25 PM.
              Justin Rio

              Comment


              • Justin, you must be thinking I have been down this road before!

                Roy

                Comment


                • JTR70
                  JTR70 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I was having a few flashbacks along the way Roy...

              • Unpeeling the onion:
                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7220.JPG Views:	0 Size:	131.0 KB ID:	110973 Going to try to save and reuse this original rocker assembly. Began melting out the body solder to expose the joint.
                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7222.JPG Views:	0 Size:	123.7 KB ID:	110974 Compared to other cars there really wasn't a whole lot of body solder used. These rockers must have been installed on a Tuesday.
                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7230.JPG Views:	0 Size:	127.7 KB ID:	110975 Like the other side the lower mount is removed to get a clean shot at the rusty section behind it.
                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7234.JPG Views:	0 Size:	130.8 KB ID:	110976 At long last all the contact points were severed and its now ready to come free.
                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7236.JPG Views:	0 Size:	166.0 KB ID:	110977 Rocker and threshold out of the way and now its onto the remains of longitudinal. The three pieces sitting on the tube where harvested from the right side as templates. This left side is the worst of the two and those pieces are long gone but fortunately I have a pattern to simply flip over. I'll also have to refer to my earlier post on the right side repair to refresh my memory on how it layers together.

                Thanks for looking!
                Justin
                Last edited by JTR70; 03-16-2021, 09:28 PM.
                Justin Rio

                Comment


                • unpeeling the onion:
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7244.JPG Views:	0 Size:	154.8 KB ID:	111028 Cutting the back section of the tube at its weld joint in preparation of removal.
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7243.JPG Views:	0 Size:	128.4 KB ID:	111029 Going to take this rear bulkhead out in one piece at its joint. Peeling up the overlay of the upper panel to expose the rest of this panel. As expected some advanced rot under here.
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ID:	111030 Both tube section and bulkhead removed giving me a clear shot this deep junction point.
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ID:	111031 Carefully chipping away the scale while taking note as to how it was originally built and layered together.
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ID:	111032 Getting my mind around which layer is which from those lower scaly remains.
                  Last edited by JTR70; 03-24-2021, 10:01 PM.
                  Justin Rio

                  Comment


                  • Click image for larger version

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ID:	111034 Unlike the other side I'll have to remove the entire bottom of this torsion housing.
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ID:	111035 The loose section is from the right side and is my pattern as to what this "1" panel should look like though the lower flange just flips the other way. It also tucks under #2 so it will have to be cut back a bit as well.
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ID:	111036 Opening up and removing more of the bottom housing and exposing a lot of scale.
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ID:	111037 Still mapping out the layers to make sure I get it right.
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ID:	111038 Bottom now fully exposed. #2 flange is heavy gauge and very rusty. Figuring out how much further I'm going to have to go. that next....

                    Thanks for looking!
                    Justin
                    Justin Rio

                    Comment


                    • Closer to touching bottom on this rear corner area:
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7295.JPG Views:	0 Size:	102.7 KB ID:	111072 Again, the rot goes a little deeper on this side so I've got to expose a little more to get past the bad stuff. This outer heavy gauge skin section (#4) will have to come off so I can get a clearer shot at the base structure of the actual torsion housing .
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ID:	111073 Outer sheath removed exposing the actual base structure that everything else layers onto. The bolt bosses are attached directly to this piece. Its very rusty and will be partially removed to give me a clean shot at that most inner panel.
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ID:	111074 Main structure cut and removed giving me the full access I need at that #1 wall. This finally gets me past the rust holes.
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ID:	111075 Not many clues left as to how that #1 inner panel actually went.
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ID:	111076 But fortunately the remains of the other side provides the info that I need.
                      Last edited by JTR70; 03-26-2021, 10:26 PM.
                      Justin Rio

                      Comment


                      • This area is so convoluted. Never understood why Porsche made these unibody cars so complicated. Soldier on Justin.
                        1960 356B T5 - under major resurrection.
                        356 Registry main thread;
                        http://forum.porsche356registry.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=35854
                        1968 912 - running like a scalded cat.

                        Comment


                        • JTR70
                          JTR70 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Layering it was their best bet to capture and secure the ends of that tube to a thin pressed metal "frame" I can only assume. Will do! Thanks Scott.

                      • So true Scott ! When I welded my car in the mid 70's it was previously a pampered car and was ( and still is ) in good condition underneath. However, the small flat area under rear torsion bar that I used to use incorrectly as a jacking point for my trolley jack had some very small pin prick rust holes. This small flat area I took back to to bare metal and made a small inspection hole to look inside which was fine. So I neatly welded some caps on to that 2" x 3" area and its been fine ever since. Looking at Justin's really good explanation of this area I had no idea it was really so complex . I do realise though now, how my car could have rusted badly here in the UK in these area's over the years without attention. I am lucky I think still to have original battery box and floors after 62 years!

                        Roy

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                        • JTR70
                          JTR70 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          It is really a complex and layered transition Roy. What could make it even more impossible is if its mostly rusted away and you're left with no reference to go by. I have forgotten a lot since I did the other side and have been going back to look at my old posts to see how it went. Yes, very lucky you didn't have to dive this deep to get past the rot.
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