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65 C hood kink, new projct

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  • #46
    JB can you explain what you mean by guide Pins and how they assist in aligning the doors.? Car is looking beautiful. Nice milestone that must have taken a lot of patience and attention to achieve.
    1960 356B T5 - under major resurrection.
    356 Registry main thread;
    http://forum.porsche356registry.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=35854
    1968 912 - running like a scalded cat.

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    • #47
      Scott
      The door pins are the threaded ones, they are just cut off long 8mm bolts, you put one in top back and lower forward hinge plate nuts. Use them to guide the door in, they hold the anchor plates and allow you to tighten first two bolts in the hinges.

      The hood pins, are also just 6mm drill rod, there are a pair of alignment holes in each hinge. Slide in these pins into the to small hinge align holes before you put in the bolts. The deck lid also has a one also Both are like a extra pair of hands.

      We had the doors and lids off many times during the paint prep, and alignment. These pins really made fitting easier.
      Pushed around since 1966.

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      • #48
        "After setting the gaps, the door latch bracket needs another small shim around 3mm to get the latch to engage fully. Stock location is sitting aft, only 1/3 of the door latch is engaged when closed, After setting the hinges, be sure to check this. The original plastic latch jam was cracked, This misalignment alignment is probably why. All the door weight was on the front edge."

        Good intel, but please allow me to expand on this segment of door latch fitting. The door swings closed in an arc, so a true engagement is when the 'finger' of the door latch is pushed down while entering the receiver, or striker, as it locks in place. Both the 'lock post' and the door end are angled, so the engagement adjustment by flat thin shims can never be 100% of the two surfaces and why, for the 356 racecars, we had CNC'd 6061 aluminum versions of the plastic strikers made.

        One needs to be careful to not shim too much on the body side parts and take what Jbrooks illustrates as a starting point. That spacing, as shown, will get more contact when fully closed due to the angle closing as it goes into a full latching engagement. A piece of masking tape in the 'down' space of the striker can give an idea of what is happening in what you can't see. Don't go too tight, or the door will bind but one also doesn't want a door flying open in a turn.....and that has happened!

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        Also, Jbrooks' pins and slotted stud-bolts can also be carried to the rear axle bearing retaining plates. I made two for that 4-bolt balancing act years ago to help with that frustration. Even for those just doing one 356 (or any Porsche), tools (called by Porsche "of local manufacture") that are helping hands are worth the little bit of time it takes to fabricate them. Justin will have all these tips in his new book....

        Bruce

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        • #49
          good info Bruce,as usual. one would not think about the arc of the door playing into this.
          Jay D.

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          • #50
            Bruce thanks, the tape make great witness marks. Everyone remember when the latch locks, it holds the door against the rubber seal, and the bottom of the latch rest on the bottom of the striker. This carries the door weight and partially unloads the hinges from the door weight. Witness marks on the tape in the striker is the last verification of a properly hung door.
            Same for the lids
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            Pushed around since 1966.

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            • #51
              Yep, I haven't been locked out of a lid since I began making masking tape bullseyes for the upper pin over the lower latch.

              Before then?
              Don't get me (or any of us old-timers) started........

              -Bruce

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              • #52
                Done, going on the trailer in a few minutes. Another one in the bag.


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                Pushed around since 1966.

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                • #53
                  Congratulations on a job well done John, She looks beautiful and love that color!

                  Justin
                  Justin Rio

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                  • #54
                    For a full documentation of this car click the link below. Paul has been reassembling and cleaning on it for a couple years. This is a very original car, it has about 45 date coded correct original parts still in the car. The blog has a monthly update on the progress and findings. Finally has the engine back in and getting ready to drive it to the 356 Registry West Coast Holliday in in Bend OR. in a couple weeks.

                    The car is now better than when it left the factory.

                    https://www.enginesinback.com
                    Last edited by Jbrooks; 09-08-2021, 03:11 AM.
                    Pushed around since 1966.

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                    • #55
                      Had a read of the blog on the link you put on John. The green 356C does look really lovely. I had a 63 C for some years and I sprayed it a similar green but it never turned out as good as Miss April!!
                      That's a good site and I will look at some of those video's.

                      Well done!
                      Roy

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